Wednesday, May 04, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Amid the deluge, solidarity and leadership emerge

A shirtless farmer trudges up to a semi-circle of singing volunteers.



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Revealed: NLD’s economic plan

The National League for Democracy’s economic strategy will focus on five “pillars” according to a document seen by The Myanmar Times.

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Nationwide ceasefire talks move into crucial phase

Informal talks to take place in Chiang Mai this week ahead of proposed meeting in Yangon in early August.

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Three years, zero landmines cleared

Lack of trust between the Tatmadaw and armed ethnic groups remains a key factor preventing NGOs from starting de-mining operations.

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Unravelling the minimum wage

Last month the National Minimum Wage Committee announced a provisional base wage of K3600 a day, due to take effect at the end of August, but factory workers and owners continue to debate the figure, and some foreign owners say they will shut their factories if the wage is enacted.

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Informal talks bring progress but familiar hurdles remain

With as little as six weeks left to finalise a nationwide ceasefire before election campaigning begins, government and ethnic leaders have resumed talks but remain divided on key issues, particularly who can sign the agreement.

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Kokang’s capital shows signs of life

Residents have started returning to Laukkai, but they say martial law is hurting business as fighting continues in southern parts of the region.

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NLD chief still barred from presidency under draft charter changes

Proposed amendments would reduce the military role in national politics by ensuring a civilian president, while also devolving more power to states.

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Daw Aung San Suu Kyi risks domestic backlash from China trip

Fighting in Kokang and controversial investments such as the Myitsone dam are likely to dominate discussions.

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Myanmar: A country of differences

More people in Myanmar have mobile phones than use electricity to light their homes, many more rely on bullock carts than possess cars or vans, and there is still a serious deficit of toilets and potable water.

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