Sunday, August 28, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Indigenous Peoples Day sends a message

“Protect our land, protect our rights.” These words hung behind the stage on August 9 at Yangon’s National Theatre during the 22nd International Day of Indigenous Peoples celebration.

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The story behind a Mandalay nat shrine

Fleeing from their wicked uncle, the two royal children took refuge under a dry teak tree not far from the banks of the Ayeyarwady River.

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Gold leaf: a look behind the scenes

He pauses to wipe sweat from his brow, which drips in the heat of a Mandalay afternoon. The respite is brief, and Zaw Win returns to the backbreaking work that is his livelihood – pounding gold leaf in Mandalay’s King Galon workshop.

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Pokemon Go works in Myanmar

Get your Pokeballs ready: Pokemon Go is a go in Myanmar.

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Run Yangon reveals city’s hidden secrets

Scavengers in their hundreds took to the streets of Yangon on August 7, poking their noses into unexpected places, accosting innocent police officers armed with candy, and hugging unsuspecting strangers.

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How to brew the perfect tea

Myanmar loves its tea, as evidenced by the tea shops scattered across the country’s street corners. phen B Twining, the 10th generation of the famous Twining tea family, visited Myanmar over the weekend to promote the family brand and shw us how to brew a proper cup.

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Trash Hero program cleans up Inya Lake

The heroes were out in force yesterday, busy protecting their world, or at least a small part of it, from the rising tide of garbage. Trash Hero mobilised its forces around the shores of Inya Lake for a morning of beautification, for the first time in Yangon.

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The night Yangon slammed

Race. Sexuality. Noodle cups. No topic was off limits at the inaugural Slam Express event held in Pansuriya on August 6.

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Dancing in the dark

No lights. No lycra. No problem.

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The other side of the tracks

The boys and girls pile on to the train at Okkalapa, stowing their wares under the seats and then using the carriage as a playground, running and shouting. Some passengers shout back at them and tell them to stop and sit down. The children are ragged, and the thanaka on their faces is streaked with sweat.

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