Saturday, July 30, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Need a reminder to breathe? There’s an app for that

A meditation teacher once told me that monks at a Zen center in the South of France regarded a ringing telephone as a “bell of mindfulness.” When the phone rang, they would pause and breathe deeply several times before answering, to bring their attention to the present. Callers knew the monks wouldn’t pick up immediately.

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Women reflect on life as painters

They are not cute and young like their millennial counterparts. All of them are older than 60, with glasses and loads of wrinkles that testify to the things they’ve seen over the years.

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Baby-making pagoda draws hopeful parents to Mandalay

On the spot where an ancient prince was born over 1000 years ago, a unique pagoda offers would-be parents hope for the future. Drink the water to have a baby – it’s worked before. 

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Looking back: a trip through Kyauktada history

History is alive and all around you. The two-day Open History: Kyauktada Exhibition at Pansodan Scene Gallery featured not dusty tomes and the names of kings, but bus tickets, flyers, and photographs of places you can still drink tea in.

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Oodles of doodles at young artist’s debut show

The first solo exhibition by young artist Aung Khant Kyaw opened at the Cloud 31 Gallery on 31st Street yesterday.

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Concert in commemoration of the Holocaust

Few activities can summon sadness and regret as well as joy and inspiration, but listening to well-played music is assuredly one. To mark the memory of the Holocaust, the embassies of Israel, Germany and Poland are jointly presenting a special concert.

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WrApp-up: Smartphone security

A run-down of some of our favourite new mobile apps. This week: Your phone needs security software, too. Naing Lin Tun breaks down three of the best.

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A potted history

A pot, a plant, a little water, a little conversation. Well, at least, a monologue. As people flock to Yangon from the great outdoors states and regions all over the country, cramming their lives into little rooms, in concrete buildings, amid stony pavements, the sight of a growing thing is more than therapeutic.

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Trading electricity for education

High marks bring hope one family’s sacrifice will pay off.

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Living and learning together

It's just like old times. Students at Yangon University are again living on-campus in hostels, living side by side, eating and studying together, and talking endlessly. But nobody seems to play the mandolin to serenade the girls’ hostel any more, because the girls aren’t allowed out after six. So what’s the point?

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