Saturday, October 01, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Treehouses on top of the world: Zip-lining to lodgings in Laos

Monkey around in the forests with a weekend Gibbon Experience.

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Painful history lessons at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

To walk the halls of Hiroshima’s Peace Memorial Museum is to trace humanity at its very worst and its very best.

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China pushes Tibetan tourism while critics fear impact

China has unveiled a sparkling new hotel as part of its drive to get tens of millions more tourists to visit Tibet, even as critics say the push is slowly eroding the local culture.

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Crouching trekker, hidden buildings: China’s urban explorers

Intrepid “urbexers” are wandering through the industrial wastelands of China, uncovering the dramas of the country’s astonishing economic rise.

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Colourful Vietnam worth dipping into

Hanoi: Five days is not enough. If you want to visit beautiful Vietnam, a 14-day tourist visa is not enough either. Now that 4-star Vietnam Airlines can take you direct from Yangon to Hanoi, Vietnam is closer than ever.

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On Everest: Meet the people scaling the world’s highest peak

It’s been called “high-altitude roulette”. Why do it?

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Indonesia beginners’ guide: Bali, Lombok, Java and Flores

This vast country’s 17,000 islands would take years to explore. Here’s what to do and see in four popular destinations.

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Bored of Bagan? Sneak off to Salay

The sleepy town of Salay is just a day trip away from Bagan, but few tourists make the effort. It’s their loss.

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Golden Land Voyage: Cruising the Ayeyarwady

I admit, the notion of luxury travel in Myanmar initially troubled me. If you don’t have to use a squat toilet or eat arguably-dangerous-to-digest street food, did you really travel in the “real” Southeast Asia?

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The man who walks the earth

Meet Mark Meigo. He’s from Estonia. Let me put that another way. Mark Meigo walked here from Estonia. And he’s planning to keep walking until he gets back to Estonia.

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