The Myanmar Times
Saturday, 25 April 2015
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Time for new thinking on contraception

On the eve of the Thingyan holidays – a period increasingly renowned for drunken partying in Myanmar – it emerged that authorities had told stores to stop selling the morning-after pill during the festival.

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Charting China's slow-growth opportunity

After four disappointing years, Chinese economists have realized that China’s potential growth rate has settled onto a significantly lower plateau. But this may not necessarily be bad news.

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Beyond the nationwide ceasefire

At long last, the ceasefire negotiations are over. Negotiators, representing the government and ethnic armed groups, successfully concluded the draft nationwide ceasefire agreement on March 31.

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Stop the presses – yes, things actually happen in Laos!

Many people labour under the illusion that nothing much happens in Laos. Or, if it does, it happens very slowly.

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Are SEZs a glimpse of the future?

Alex Jaggard, country representative for Mekong Economics, looks into the potential benefits of Special Economic Zones (SEZs) in Myanmar.

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As China slows, can Myanmar benefit?

With China settling into a “new normal” of more gradual economic growth, Curtis Chin and Jose Collazo weigh in on the economic opportunities for Myanmar and ASEAN at large.

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A dangerous path for Myanmar

Population control measures are clearly targeted at Muslims, particularly the Rohingya of Rakhine State.


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Editorial: Rise above personal interest

The March 8 meeting attended by four dozen political leaders in Nay Pyi Taw has prepared the way for a long awaited six-party meeting today.

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What is Daw Aung San Suu Kyi worried about?

“We don’t think boycotting the election is the best choice. But we’re not ruling it out altogether. We are leaving our options open.”

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Fear, favour infect the region’s media

When pondering media repression in this region, it is not the blatant cases of molesting, detaining and jailing journalists that inflame us most, but the craftier controls enforced by backroom bureaucrats and company bagmen.

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