The Myanmar Times
Monday, 03 August 2015
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

The centre of the neighbourhood

Positioned between two of the largest countries in the world, Myanmar must balance external pressures and internal potential as it continues to grow.

Continue reading »

Defending rights workers against abuse

As Angelina Jolie Pitt visits Myanmar this week, her high-profile role as a campaigner working to end sexual violence in conflict brings gender-related abuse onto the national news agenda.

Continue reading »

Leaks, deaths and political power plays engulf Hanoi

In some of the region’s politically closed societies, even the death of a leader can be exploited, and often with weird consequences - especially if the guy has not actually conked out yet.

Continue reading »

You don’t have to ‘like’ the news

A new study shows that offering a “respect” option together with a “like” button can prompt a significantly different response from readers.

Continue reading »

Race for the presidency gets dirty

For months now, evidence of a split in the Union Solidarity and Development Party has been clearly visible.

Continue reading »

Myanmar’s middle-class bulge

KFC’s arrival in Yangon isn’t simply about adding another unhealthy option to Myanmar’s smorgasbord of deep-fried delights.

Continue reading »

Remembering girls

Recently I found myself in Venice unexpectedly. Having arrived on an urgent and all-consuming matter, I ruefully realised that although the city’s legendary biennale was under way, I had little appetite for any of its artistic offerings.

Continue reading »

The election – free, fair and credible?

The people of Myanmar deserve more than an election that is simply an improvement on the scandal-plagued 2010 vote.

Continue reading »

Amazing Grace glides into the lead

Her name is Grace Poe and she looks like a mousey schoolmistress. But do not be deceived: This mother of three kids is one tough cookie.

Continue reading »

Blasphemy statutes deny human rights

Rather than being used to curb communal tension as originally intended, anti-blasphemy laws are increasingly wielded in some countries to punish those whose acts of expression are thought to clash with conservative interpretations of the majority religion.

Continue reading »