Sunday, May 01, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Political sensitivity does not require driving women and children into the arms of death

Last week an avoidable tragedy hit families in Rakhine when at least 21 people drowned after a boat carrying them to market capsized.

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The right time for climate action

During most of the roughly three decades since climate change became a global concern, governments optimistically assumed that a green transition would happen naturally over time, as rising fossil-fuel prices nudged consumers toward low-carbon alternatives. The impediment, it was believed, was on the production side, as gushing returns on oilfield investments spurred ever more ambitious exploration.

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The irresistible rise of the populists

The world is witnessing a new breed of leaders who claim to know what ordinary people want and say they will stop at nothing to deliver these things.

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Malaria makes a deadly comeback

The dramatic drop in malaria deaths since the beginning of the century is one of the great public-health success stories of recent years. Thanks to concerted investments in prevention, diagnosis and treatment, the number of people killed by the disease each year has declined 60 percent since 2000, saving more than 6 million lives.

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India needs to do more in Myanmar

In what some are seeing as the first step toward a stronger assertion of its interests in Myanmar, India’s External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj will arrive on May 1 in the country’s first high-level engagement with Myanmar since the National League for Democracy government took office. The minister will meet President U Htin Kyaw and State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who also holds the post of foreign minister.

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Double marginalisation of Myanmar’s ethnic minorities

For the first time in over half a century, Myanmar has a government with a popular mandate, led by the National League for Democracy. Although the armed forces still have extensive political powers under the 2008 constitution, and may seriously curtail the independent action of the new government, the inauguration of President U Htin Kyaw represents a radical increase in the internal and international legitimacy of the Myanmar state.

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Bullying, democratic or otherwise

April 6, 2016: a neologism enters the already-overcrowded field of political vocabulary as a military member of parliament, Brigadier General Maung Maung, accuses the majority National League for Democracy of “democratic bullying”.

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New year, new politics?

One of the things I love about Thingyan is that we can all get involved. It doesn’t matter who you are – rich or poor, old or young, local or foreign – everyone is united as one soggy mess.

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In the fight against slavery, women are not just victims

Slavery and trafficking: ugly, evil businesses that undermine the most basic human rights and must never be tolerated.

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Raising awareness and education needed to bring down the traffic death toll

This week, Myanmar’s economy will virtually pause for five days of intense celebrations. Thingyan, the water festival that celebrates the passing into a New Year, is of course a period of happiness and joy, but it also has a dark side to it. Last year the Myanmar Police Force reported that 16 people died and 356 more were injured because of traffic accidents and crimes. In many of the traffic fatalities drunk driving was a factor.

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