The Myanmar Times
Tuesday, 26 May 2015
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Ethnic politics from the capital

When you have 135 official ethnic, or “national race”, categories, it’s hardly surprising that ethnic politics take up a great deal of space. Consider what happens in grandiose Nay Pyi Taw.

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Editorial: International loans demand sound state management

One of the most visible and tangible outcomes of the reforms launched by Myanmar’s quasi-civilian government is the re-engagement of multilateral lenders, including the Asian Development Bank.

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What is the UEC scared of?

Members of a new political entity calling itself the Women’s Party have been told by the Union Election Commission they should change the organisation’s name, it was reported this week.

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Editorial: What are the forces driving migration?

The surge of “boat people” arrivals into Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand merits closer enquiry into the issue of regional migration. The majority of the trafficked people are from Myanmar and Bangladesh.

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Economic turbulence threatens region

It’s a well-known adage that if you want to know how the market is doing, ask a bartender or taxi driver rather than a stockbroker or financial analyst.

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Ceasefire or political dialogue first?

Which should come first: the nationwide ceasefire or political dialogue? This is not a chicken-and-egg question.

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Can new voices quell hate speech?

An unusual book launch was held at the House of Media & Entertainment on Yangon’s Bo Aung Kyaw Street on April 25.

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Scrambling to draw lessons

There is a natural rush to draw lessons from what has been happening these recent, busy years.


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Editorial: Money matters

This year, 2015, appears likely to hold elections for many countries around the globe.

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What role should state enterprises have in the changing business environment?

As Myanmar transitions into a more open and competitive environment, the government will have to decide what role these enterprises take in the country's economic future. There are a number of options, though not all of them may be right for the economy.

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