Wednesday, September 28, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Kofi Annan’s commission should be welcomed for what it is: a paradigm shift

State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s appointment of the Kofi Annan-led commission on Rakhine State clearly evidences the government’s recognition that these issues have risen to an international scale. Such a commission, and the inclusion of foreign experts, could not have been conceived of even a year ago.

Continue reading »

Low-carbon energy is imperative for sustainable, resilient development

Myanmar is at a critical juncture. The energy choices it makes will have significant and long-term environmental, economic, social and political consequences.

Continue reading »

China is destined to lead, but is not yet ready

For a great power to lead the world there are a few qualities that it should bring to the table. These include, but are not limited to, material strength, an aspiration for recognition and sufficient international support. Does China currently possess these qualities?

Continue reading »

Teaching democracy studies in Thailand

Soon after the May 2014 coup I joined the faculty of Mahidol University and was asked to teach a course on “Democracy as a Political System”. I wondered at what seemed a poisoned chalice. A colleague told me, only half-joking, to keep a wad of cash for a sudden escape. The subject was not new, but the setting was. How do you teach democracy in a country that has just suspended it?

Continue reading »

Duty isn’t enough to boost tax revenue

In the past few weeks, colourful signboards have been erected around Yangon reminding people of their obligation to pay tax.

Continue reading »

Does globalisation hurt poor workers?

Political economists have long debated whether globalisation started a “race to the bottom” throughout the developing world – that is, a lowering of labour and environmental standards as governments fiercely compete to attract multinational corporations and supply chain contracts.

Continue reading »

Govt failing its duty to protect women

Initial analysis of the gender balance at the recent 21st-century Panglong Conference offers some fascinating insights into attitudes toward women among different sectors of those involved in the country’s peace process.

Continue reading »

We cannot afford to be silent bystanders to domestic violence

While walking along Bogyoke Road one evening last week, my partner and I noticed something odd.

Continue reading »

Religion after the referendum

One of the most controversial policies in Thailand’s new constitution surrounds religion.

Continue reading »

ASEAN: If it’s broke, time to fix it

After Brexit, the United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union, it was reported that some members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations were considering a similar move. It is not going to happen just yet, but many officials are increasingly – and angrily – demanding that ASEAN must change if it is to survive.

Continue reading »