The Myanmar Times
Thursday, 17 April 2014
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Page 2: The Insider

An irreverent look at local news brought to you by Myanmar Times online editor Kayleigh Long.



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Why compromise is not a dirty word

Compromise is controversial but it is often a necessary step to end a long-running, deadly conflict, writes the Myanmar Peace Center's Aung Naing Oo.

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With his ranting and raving, Gareth misses the real targets

Roger Mitton on former Australian foreign minister and ICG head Gareth Evans, and his grasp on affairs in Cambodia.

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Equality for women is progress for all

Fifteen years after the Millennium Development Goals, Myanmar goes through a phase of unprecedented reform – but much remains to be done to reduce gender equality gaps writes UN Resident Co-ordinator Bertrand Bainvel.

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Compromising for peace

Compromise is controversial but it is often a necessary step to end a long-running, deadly conflict, writes the MPC  Peace Dialogue Program associate director Aung Naing Oo.

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Public companies: Beware the hype

Myanmar is the only Southeast Asian country without a functioning stock exchange but that is soon likely to change, writes Sithu Aung Myint.

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Sarawak’s White Rajah calls it a day

On February 28, a truly momentous event took place: The last White Rajah of the East Malaysian state of Sarawak finally stepped down.

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Wanted: one political agreement

Political talks between the four – or five – main stakeholders are needed to ensure Myanmar avoids instability prior to the 2015 general election.


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Can China and India coexist in Myanmar?

Risk analysts Daniel Wagner and Giorgio Cafiero on China and India's roles in Myanmar, and the complex historical and geopolitical relationship between the three countries.

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Myanmar firms not alone on sanctions list

When people in this region talk about economic sanctions imposed by the United States, they invariably assume the discussion is about Myanmar.


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