Friday, July 29, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Elie Wiesel’s undying message: Don’t just memorialise, act

In 1973, five years before US President Jimmy Carter would appoint Elie Wiesel to chair a commission to determine how the United States should memorialise the Holocaust, Mr Wiesel was already a prominent author and thinker. On the other side of the planet, I was an untested middle-school English teacher in Sydney, Australia, fresh out of an American college. No one could have predicted that 20 years later we would be together at the opening of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC.

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Keeping friends close, Thailand closer

It says something profound about the region that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s first international trips as state counsellor and foreign minister have required photo ops with Southeast Asian dictators.

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We need rule of law, not mob rule

Now here is an interesting juxtaposition of cases: On the same day that ministers announced there would be no legal action against members of a mob that broke into a mosque and assaulted a Muslim man in Bago Region, we learned that U Gambira – a former monk and Saffron Revolution leader – is facing new charges relating to an incident in 2012 when he allegedly forced open monasteries sealed by authorities after the monk-led uprising.

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Brexit’s lesson for Asia’s democracies

The United Kingdom, in voting to divorce itself from the European Union, is steering the West into uncharted territory. Will the EU now unravel, as other populists and nationalists demand plebiscites on their respective countries’ membership?

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In Thailand, a dangerous militarisation of justice

More than two years since the National Council for Peace and Order staged a coup, the military regime in Thailandcontinues to justify its grip on power by running the systematic militarisation of law and the judicial process against its critics, political dissidents and ordinary citizens, write the Thai Lawyers for Human Rights.

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Spurn this poisoned chalice, Daw Suu

It was an unusual suggestion from an unexpected source and it signalled the extraordinary desperation that pervades the thinking of some of the region’s most senior leaders.

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Could a basic income help poor countries?

The old idea of recasting the welfare state by instituting an unconditional, universal basic income has lately been capturing imaginations across the political spectrum. But could it actually work?

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The nationwide ceasefire from a gender equality and women’s rights perspective

What do gender equality advocates in Myanmar want from a nationwide ceasefire and does the existing nationwide ceasefire agreement deliver?

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For many Muslims, Sufi singer Amjad Sabri’s murder is about more than music

Last week, the music died. Amjad Sabri, a master of qawwali, the devotional music that is wildly popular across the Indian subcontinent and well beyond, was gunned down in Karachi, Pakistan. The man who spent his life singing the praises of the prophet Muhammad, was accused of blaspheming the prophet, and he was executed for it.

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Unpacking the meaning of ‘Brexit’

The Brexit vote was a triple protest: against surging immigration, City of London bankers and European Union institutions, in that order. It will have major consequences. Donald Trump’s campaign for the US presidency will receive a huge boost, as will other anti-immigrant populist politicians. Moreover, leaving the EU will wound the British economy and could well push Scotland to leave the United Kingdom – to say nothing of Brexit’s ramifications for the future of European integration.

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