Wednesday, July 27, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

The fight against child labour begin at home

Good news this week that the government is promising to clamp down on the use of child labour in the workplace.

Continue reading »

The ASEAN stooges do it again

The fiasco at last week’s ministerial meeting in the southern Chinese city of Kunming might be dismissed as laughable were it not for the fact that it has driven yet another nail into the mouldering coffin of ASEAN.

Continue reading »

Capitalising on the gulf states’ expat dividend

How should policymakers in the Middle East’s Gulf States manage their countries’ large expatriate workforces? In Saudi Arabia, foreign nationals account for roughly one-third of the population. In Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, nine out of every 10 residents is an expatriate. Should these countries’ governments continue to invest heavily in developing indigenous labour forces, with the aim of decreasing dependency on foreign workers?

Continue reading »

The Lady and a junta, Thai-style

The visit this week by Nobel Peace Prize laureate and democracy icon Daw Aung San Suu Kyi will certainly brighten the spirits of the sombre Thai people and could also lift the profile of the Thai junta and Myanmar’s top leader.

Continue reading »

The world’s ins and outs

As the United Kingdom’s debate about whether to withdraw from the European Union has heated up, “in” and “out” have come to define the stark choice facing voters in this week’s “Brexit” referendum. The British are not alone: The world is an increasingly divided place.

Continue reading »

Myanmar’s UK diaspora weigh in on ‘Brexit’

With a referendum on the UK’s membership in the European Union set for June 23, Myetchae Thu interviewed other Myanmar nationals living in Britain about their concerns and which way they intend to vote.

Continue reading »

Hong Kong ‘will not bow down’ to China

Powerlessness and fear overtake a person who is suddenly arrested by secret police and spirited away. The harrowing story told by Lam Wing-kee in Hong Kong on June 16 of his arrest and imprisonment by Chinese authorities is one such saga of helplessness, bewilderment and pressure.

Continue reading »

Academic analysis in the age of reform

When I was first asked to write a weekly column about Myanmar political and social affairs, I jumped at the chance. The primary reason is that I think academic analysts should take part in public debate.

Continue reading »

Stop trying to rationalise hatred

After the tragedy that took place in Orlando this week, it is natural that people want to find reasons for the killer’s actions – to find some way of making order out of bloody, terrifying chaos.

Continue reading »

Which policies to prioritise?

Every day, policymakers around the world face a dizzying array of choices. The more they spend on, say, education, the less there is to run hospitals, fight pollution or boost agricultural productivity. And most countries’ politics have proverbial “third rail” issues – policies or programs (say, state pensions) that are so sacrosanct that any policymaker who touches them faces instant political death.

Continue reading »