The Myanmar Times
Wednesday, 22 October 2014
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Escape the madding crowd

It’s good news week. You may remember the hit song of that name by the British pop group, Hedgehoppers Anonymous.

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The message John Kerry must give to Myanmar’s leaders

US Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in Myanmar’s capital Nay Pyi Taw on August 9 for a three-day visit.US Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in Myanmar’s capital Nay Pyi Taw on August 9 for a three-day visit.

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Is this the world’s wordiest ceasefire?

At 20 pages, with seven chapters and about 120 different points, it’s hard not to agree with the international conflict resolution expert who recently called Myanmar’s draft nationwide ceasefire agreement as the world’s lengthiest ceasefire deal.

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Singapore: the good, the bad and the sad

Sitting in a pleasant watering hole last week, no fewer than three people assured me that the media in Singapore is the most heavily censored in the region.

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Taking on Muslim-owned media

Communal, or religious, violence started breaking out in 2012, shortly after President U Thein Sein’s government took office.


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Shared frontiers, distant neighbours

The shared frontiers of India and Myanmar have been a perennial area of study for scholars and researchers of South Asia and Southeast Asia, writes Sonu Trivedi.

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Is Myanmar marching toward political crisis?

More than three years after President U Thein Sein took office, Myanmar is at a crossroads and appears to be on the verge of political crisis, writes Sithu Aung Myint.

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Why ‘The Myanmar Times’ is more important than ever

Over the past decade or so The Myanmar Times has continued to expand its operations in a nation that falls far short of its potential for sound and informative publishing, writes editor-in-chief Ross Dunkley.

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Fragile Fourth Estate needs our attention

Myanmar's greatest asset is its people. If this nation wants to advance, the most important thing is to unlock its human potential. The only way to do that is by giving people the freedom they need to develop their talents and capabilities.

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Responsible tourism - are development partners doing enough?

Media reports regularly highlight how Myanmar tourism is experiencing spectacular growth and out-performing other sectors of the economy – but is it being managed in a sustainable way?

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