The Myanmar Times
Thursday, 17 April 2014
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Patronage, sexism and the way forward

Patronage and discrimination against women are not unique to Myanmar, and exist to varying degrees even in developed countries. But their prevalence here is troubling, writes Lian Kual Sang.

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A sage message of tolerance from a visionary Lao soldier

Roger Mitton on the recent passing of Captain Kong Le, a soldier from southern Laos, who rose to prominence some 50 years ago.


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Can a minimum wage law work?

Setting and enforcing a minimum wage is just one step in improving the lives of the country’s workers, say labour activists.



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Time for patience, persistence

The government should be careful not to let anxiety over the pace of reforms trump the need for careful planning, writes JICA's Masahiko Tanaka.



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Nay Pyi Taw slides into the hot seat

Roger Mitton on Myanmar taking the helm of the ASEAN bloc, and its stated position that the Rohingya issue is not up for discussion.

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Early days for foreign investors

The problem for investors is that the vast majority of Myanmar’s most desirable natural resources are located in the ethnic-minority-dominated borderlands that surround the country like a horseshoe.

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Page 2: The Insider

The local lowdown and best of the web brought to you by the online department at The Myanmar Times.

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Why we need to negotiate a win-win solution for peace

During negotiations, disputants tend to think of problems more than they do solutions.

 

 

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Ominous echoes of Myanmar, Thailand

Last July, Prime Minister Hun Sen and his Cambodian People’s Party narrowly won the nation’s fifth general election since the era of civil war and foreign occupation.

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The Rohingya: partners in building a new Myanmar

While diversity can be one of Myanmar's strengths, it has also sowed the seeds of discord for too long writes Wakar Uddin.

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