Monday, February 08, 2016
The Myanmar Times
The Myanmar Times

Stopping the two main child-killers is within reach

In  far too many places around the world, the biggest child killers are caused by the smallest of organisms – the viruses, bacteria, and single cell parasites that cause diarrhoea and pneumonia. Given the monumental advances that have been made in public health – both diseases are preventable and curable – this is inexcusable. It is imperative that all children, especially those most at risk, have access to life-saving health-care services.

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Ceasefire implementation stays on track

Diplomats, friends and analysts at home and abroad thought that it was never going to happen. They were sceptical. They told us that we often falsely predicted the end of Myanmar’s ceasefire negotiations. Rightly so – we did on many occasions.

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The promise of China’s G-20 presidency at a crucial time

In less than a month, China will assume the G-20 presidency. Over the next year – and especially at the organisation’s September summit, to be held in Hangzhou – China plans to help lay the groundwork for a world economy that is more “innovative, invigorated, interconnected and inclusive”.

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NLD grapples with competition and policy

Conversations about Myanmar are rapidly adjusting to what we guess will be the new normal.


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What’s the right kind of love for king and country?

When it comes to fierce, honest debates, the clashing of opposing ideas and rousing Churchillian speeches, nobody does it better than the British House of Commons.

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Minding your Ps and Qs when discussing procreative parts in court

In a remarkable twist of already ludicrous legal proceedings, it emerged this week that the lawyer defending poet U Maung Saungkha against defamation charges has asked for the young female judge to be taken off the case because the trial will involve the use of words “unsuitable” for womanly ears.

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From good intentions to deep decarbonisation

In the run-up to the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP21) in Paris, more than 150 governments submitted plans to reduce carbon emissions by 2030. Many observers are asking whether these reductions are deep enough. But there is an even more important question: Will the chosen path to 2030 provide the basis for ending greenhouse-gas emissions later in the century?

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Pick the low-hanging fruit to get tough on climate change

One might think – after years of focus on global warming – that all the easy measures for reducing greenhouse gas emissions had been taken. And yet, as governments prepare for their 21st annual conference on climate change (COP21), some surprisingly low-hanging fruit remains.

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Can we shuck this cloud of darkness?

Forgive the arch comparison, but Joseph Conrad’s novel Heart of Darkness comes to mind when trying to comprehend the politics of this region.

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Keeping afloat after the ‘red wave’

Myanmar’s election results have been cause for much hope and celebration as the political map has been decisively redrawn and an exciting new chapter opens in the country’s history.

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